Paris
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Discover 80 places to see in Paris

Admire the most beautiful places of Paris and add them to your basket. YAMGU will create your trip considering distances, opening hours and weather.


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Avenue George V

Avenue George V is a street in the 8th arrondissement of Paris. It is 730 meters long and 40 meters wide. It starts at the Alma and ends at No. 99 avenue des Champs-Elysées, and marks the western limit of Paris's "golden triangle" (triangle d'or). Four Seasons Hotel George V is located on this avenue.
Until Bastille Day 1918, the avenue was called Avenue d'Alma. It received its current name in honour of the British monarch George V, who was on the throne at the time, and had supported France during the First World War.


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Abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés

The Benedictine Abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés (French pronunciation: ​[sɛ̃ ʒɛʁmɛ̃ de pʁe]), just beyond the outskirts of early medieval Paris, was the burial place of Merovingian kings of Neustria. At that time, the Left Bank of Paris was prone to flooding from the Seine, so much of the land could not be built upon and the Abbey stood in the middle of meadows, or prés in French, thereby explaining its appellation.
The Abbey was founded in the 6th century by the son of Clovis I, Childebert I (ruled 511–558). Under royal patronage the Abbey became one of the richest in France, as demonstrated b


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Arab World Institute

The Arab World Institute (abbreviated "AWI"; French: Institut du Monde Arabe, abbreviated "IMA") is an organization founded in Paris in 1980 by 18 Arab countries with France to research and disseminate information about the Arab world and its cultural and spiritual values. The Institute also promotes cooperation and exchanges between France and the Arab nations, particularly in the areas of science and technology, contributing to the understanding between the Arab world and Europe. Libya joined the institute in 1984.

Architectural features of the AWI building


The AWI is located in a building kn


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Arc de Triomphe

The Arc de Triomphe de l'Étoile (French pronunciation: [aʁk də tʁijɔ̃f də letwal], Triumphal Arch of the Star) is one of the most famous monuments in Paris. It stands in the centre of the Place Charles de Gaulle (originally named Place de l'Étoile), at the western end of the Champs-Élysées. It should not be confused with a smaller arch, the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel, which stands west of the Louvre. The Arc de Triomphe honours those who fought and died for France in the French Revolutionary and the Napoleonic Wars, with the names of all French victories and generals inscribed on its inner a


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Basilica of St Denis

The Basilica of Saint Denis (French: known as Basilique royale de Saint-Denis, or simply Basilique Saint-Denis) is a large medieval abbey church in the city of Saint-Denis, now a northern suburb of Paris. The building is of unique importance historically and architecturally as its choir, completed in 1144, is considered to be the first Gothic church.
The site originated as a Gallo-Roman cemetery in late Roman times. The archeological remains still lie beneath the cathedral; the people buried there seem to have had a faith that was a mix of Christian and pre-Christian beliefs and practices. Arou


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Bois de Boulogne

The Bois de Boulogne (French pronunciation: ​[bwa.d(ə).bu.lɔɲ]) is a large public park located along the western edge of the 16th arrondissement of Paris, near the suburb of Boulogne-Billancourt and Neuilly-sur-Seine It was created between 1852 and 1858 during the reign of the Emperor Louis Napoleon.
It is the second-largest park in Paris, slightly smaller than the Bois de Vincennes on the eastern side of the city. It covers an area of 845 hectares (2090 acres) which is about two and a half times the area of Central Park in New York and slightly less (88%) than that of Richmond Park in London.
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Canal Saint-Martin

The Canal Saint-Martin is a 4.5 km long canal in Paris. It connects the Canal de l'Ourcq to the river Seine and runs underground between Bastille (Paris Métro) and République (Paris Métro). It is drained and cleaned every 10-15 years, uncovering tonnage of garbage and treasure alike.

History


Construction of the canal was ordered by Napoleon I in 1802, in order to create an artificial waterway for supplying Paris with fresh water to support a growing population and to help avoid diseases such as dysentery and cholera.
Gaspard de Chabrol, prefect of Paris, proposed building a canal from the Ourcq


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Carnavalet Museum

The Carnavalet Museum in Paris is dedicated to the history of the city. The museum occupies two neighboring mansions: the Hôtel Carnavalet and the former Hôtel Le Peletier de Saint Fargeau. On the advice of Baron Haussmann, the civil servant who transformed Paris in the latter half of the 19th century, the Hôtel Carnavalet was purchased by the Municipal Council of Paris in 1866; it was opened to the public in 1880. By the latter part of the 20th century, the museum was bursting at the seams. The Hôtel Le Peletier de Saint Fargeau was annexed to the Carnavalet and opened to the public in 1989.
C


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